Yann Voljean

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Bio/Contact/Info

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Yann Voljean is a queer and trans Spanish visual creator currently exploring the vibrant world of creativity on the margins.

They are a photographer, videographer, and digital media editor who is passionate about youth access to media arts and the power of images as a means of self expression.

Yann has lead and worked on a diverse range of projects, including a spoken word poetry video series, architectural photojournalism in over 13 countries, editing at TIFF and Toronto fashion week and focused on creating spaces for youth and arts in communities in Spain. They are currently working on a project to empower queer youth for the next Nuit Blanche 2018 and particular currently working on the upcoming 10X10 exhibition during Pride featuring 10 portraits of queer artists with experiences of immigration

 
 

Say Hey

 

yannvoljean@gmail.com

Also find me on social media:

 
 

 
 

Some selected accolades

 
  • IDP CHALLENGE 2017 - Winner, Best Conceptual Photography (Dylan Ellis Gallery, Toronto)
     
  • EXPOSURE AWARD 2015 - Featured Artist, Architectural Series (The Louvre, Paris)

 

 
 

 
 

Land

Acknowledgment

We are situated in Tkaronto, on the historical territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the New Credit Indigenous peoples. This territory is covered by the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Haudenosaunee and the Ojibwe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the lands and resources around the Great Lakes.

The territory was the subject of the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Iroquois Confederacy and Confederacy of the Ojibwe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the resources around the Great Lakes. Today, the meeting place of Toronto is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work in the community, on this territory.

We are also mindful of broken covenants and the need to strive to make right with all our relations.